In the United States of America you can hunt:


  • Aoudad
  • Alligator

  • Bighorn sheep
  • Bison
  • Black duck
  • Black bear
  • Bobwhite tail
  • Brown quail

  • Canada moose
  • California quail
  • Caribou
  • Chestnut teal
  • Chital
  • Chukar
  • Common pigeon
  • Coues deer
  • Cougar
  • Crested pigeon

  • Elk

Elk are also called wapiti, a Native American word that means "light-colored deer." Elk tend to be broader than deer, but not as massive as moose. They are typically, 4 to 5 feet (1.2 to 1.5 meters) from hoof to shoulder and weigh 325 to 1,100 lbs. (147 to 499 kilograms), according to National Geographic. An elk’s antlers make it much taller. A male elk's antlers can grow up to 4 feet (1.2 m) above its head, making it around 9 feet (2.7 m) tall in all. Females do not have antlers.

Bull elk lose their antlers each March, but they begin to grow them back in May in preparation for the late-summer breeding season. . New antlers are covered with a soft coating called velvet

In early summer, elk migrate to high mountain grazing grounds where the cows (females) will give birth. Each cow typically has a single calf, which can stand by the time it is 20 minutes old.

During the late summer breeding season the bugling of bull elk echoes through the mountains. These powerful animals strip the velvet off their new antlers using them in violent clashes that determine who gets to mate with whom. Males with the bigger antlers, typically older animals, usually win these battles and dominate small herds.

In the winter, wapiti reconvene into larger herds, though males and females typically remain separate. The herds return to lower valley pastures where elk spend the season pawing through snow to browse on grass or settling for shrubs that stand clear of the snow cover.

Elk are members of the Cervidae family, which includes caribou, deer and moose. Like their relatives, elk have massive antlers and long legs with cloven hooves. Elk antlers have  six tines, or branches, total.

Habitat

Elks are found all over the world. Large wild populations are mostly found in North America, in the western United States from Canada through the Eastern Rockies to New Mexico and in the northern lower peninsula of Michigan, according to the University of Michigan's Animal Diversity Web (ADW). They prefer woodlands, but they can also be found in clear cuts, open mountains, coniferous swamps, aspen-hardwood forests and coniferous-hardwood forests. They tend to stay clear of dense forests.

Habits

Elk are social animals and live in groups called herds. Herds are often quite large, with 200 or more members, according to the Smithsonian. Some herds have over 400 members. The herd is often segregated by gender, with males staying in one group and females in another. Though segregated, herds are matriarchal, which means it is run by a single female.

Harems of elk are common during mating season. A dominant male will have a herd of around six females and their yearlings. The male will defend his territory around the females until mating season is over.

Elk are most active during mornings and evenings. During the summer, elk will often migrate to higher, cooler, elevations and migrate to lower elevations in the winter.

Elk are also called wapiti, a Native American word that means "light-colored deer." Elk tend to be broader than deer, but not as massive as moose. They are typically, 4 to 5 feet (1.2 to 1.5 meters) from hoof to shoulder and weigh 325 to 1,100 lbs. (147 to 499 kilograms), according to National Geographic. An elk’s antlers make it much taller. A male elk's antlers can grow up to 4 feet (1.2 m) above its head, making it around 9 feet (2.7 m) tall in all. Females do not have antlers.

Bull elk lose their antlers each March, but they begin to grow them back in May in preparation for the late-summer breeding season. . New antlers are covered with a soft coating called velvet

In early summer, elk migrate to high mountain grazing grounds where the cows (females) will give birth. Each cow typically has a single calf, which can stand by the time it is 20 minutes old.

During the late summer breeding season the bugling of bull elk echoes through the mountains. These powerful animals strip the velvet off their new antlers using them in violent clashes that determine who gets to mate with whom. Males with the bigger antlers, typically older animals, usually win these battles and dominate small herds.

In the winter, wapiti reconvene into larger herds, though males and females typically remain separate. The herds return to lower valley pastures where elk spend the season pawing through snow to browse on grass or settling for shrubs that stand clear of the snow cover.

Elk are members of the Cervidae family, which includes caribou, deer and moose. Like their relatives, elk have massive antlers and long legs with cloven hooves. Elk antlers have  six tines, or branches, total.

Habitat

Elks are found all over the world. Large wild populations are mostly found in North America, in the western United States from Canada through the Eastern Rockies to New Mexico and in the northern lower peninsula of Michigan, according to the University of Michigan's Animal Diversity Web (ADW). They prefer woodlands, but they can also be found in clear cuts, open mountains, coniferous swamps, aspen-hardwood forests and coniferous-hardwood forests. They tend to stay clear of dense forests.

Habits

Elk are social animals and live in groups called herds. Herds are often quite large, with 200 or more members, according to the Smithsonian. Some herds have over 400 members. The herd is often segregated by gender, with males staying in one group and females in another. Though segregated, herds are matriarchal, which means it is run by a single female.

Harems of elk are common during mating season. A dominant male will have a herd of around six females and their yearlings. The male will defend his territory around the females until mating season is over.

Elk are most active during mornings and evenings. During the summer, elk will often migrate to higher, cooler, elevations and migrate to lower elevations in the winter.


  • Fallow deer
  • Fox

  • Goat
  • Gray wolf
  • Grizzly bear
  • Guinea fowl

  • Hare
  • Himalayan snow cock
  • Hog deer

  • Mountain goat

  • Oryx (Gemsbuck)

  • Partridge
  • Peafowl
  • Pheasant
  • Pig
  • Pronghorn

  • Rabbit
  • Red deer
  • Rusa deer

  • Sambar deer
  • Shelduck duck
  • Spotted dove
  • Stubble quail
  • Whitetail deer
  • Wild boar
  • Wild sheep